Spark (Firecracker Mix)


About the Song

Back in 2010 I did an electronica album with Japanese vocaloid Megurine Luka called Kaleidoscope (the project was Subtle Inversion). My intention was to finally explore some of my pop leanings in a public way and do something that was thoroughly different from everything else I had been working on up to that point. Unfortunately, production on this release was plagued with issues and delays, mostly stemming from my own lack of experience behind the mixing desk with a genre so far removed from the dark, orchestral music I had been working on almost exclusively since 1998. Following Kaleidoscope’s eventual release in July of that year, I had planned on assembling an EP of remixes and unreleased tracks (Prism) as a fanbase exclusive, with the physical (CD) copies being offered in a choice of five different colors as a fun little tie in to the album titles. As fortune would have it, the latter part of 2010 saw the unexpected transition of my CD and DVD duplication company, Home Circle Media, into a full-fledged anime retailer, and I found my attention being pulled more and more in that direction. The requirements of being a full-time business owner essentially meant that music projects like Parlormuse and Subtle Inversion were being forced to take a back seat – at least for a while.

I’ve always loved remixes – particularly the ones done in the 1980s by such talented engineers as Nile Rodgers, The Latin Rascals, and Gareth Jones. I had quite a 12-inch single collection back in the day, and sometimes I think I listened to the remixed versions of certain songs more than the album versions! I always found it fascinating how an engineer could tear apart a song’s elements and reassemble or manipulate them in ways that resulted in something thoroughly exciting and new. Later remixes tended to add completely unrelated elements, and these I found decidedly less interesting, with the notable exception of those released by Nine Inch Nails, which always seemed to preserve at least the core character of the original songs. I think a lot of the attraction for me was in seeing how creative and innovative the engineer could get with what they had right in front of them, and I think that taps the same sense of challenge and reward offered by writing and recording with limited equipment: it forces you to think outside the box and really experiment and explore.

This remix definitely follows in that throwback vein of using only what was in the original song, although as you’ll hear, many of the elements have been dramatically altered and/or processed.

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